Flora Filipina 2012 : More Fun in Growing Native Plants

Hardin ng mga Bulaklak, Quezon Memorial Circle, Quezon City -Philippines

Philippine Native Plant Conservation Society Incorporated  PNPCSI exhibit booth was done by the tandem of Architect Patrick Gozun , Mr. Anthony Arbias  and some plants were supplied by Jardin Isabel .

Dischidia oinantha

Being a member of the society, I also took time during the ingress period to help in the mounting of  Dischia oinantha clumps  from the top of the bamboo poles . The hanging plant is commonly called Manaog Ka Irog , Hanging coin vine . This is also widely used in the landscaping of big gardens and popularly grown as a hanging plant on the eves of the homes or hung on big trees.

adobe stone blocks, pebbles, old wooden poles, old railroad woods , bamboo poles and coco coir dust are just some of the materials used in the landscaping.

Although not the most colorful exhibit , the different green color combination of the plants , ferns, native trees and vines ,  style of the landscaping and the wise choice of  native materials like bamboo poles , abaca twine and adobe stones . Truly reflects the mission and vision of the society, which promotes the propagation, preservation and eventual use of our Philippine native  flora species for landscaping in urban centers and parks.

Ardisia pyramidalis (Cav.) Pers

This particular flowering trees had won the ” Best other Genera – Flowering ” exhibited by Mr. Carlos Valeriano C. Lazaro during the show.

Ardisia pyramidalis is locally called  aunasin , rugrusu . This is a small tree which can reach its height up to 8 feet tall . Although is not considered as endemic, it is indigenous also being found in other neighboring countries like Malaysia, Indonesia  and the Philippines.

 farm propagated Phalaenopsis species and other native orchids being sold at  a commercial stall .

I have seen that there is growing awareness from the public the need to cultivate native plants not just to collect them in the wild but to propagate them in local nurseries using modern and traditional techniques in propagation.

 Dendrobium anosmum with its 7- feet long canes

Locally called Sanggumay orchid, This is one of the old -time favorite among Filipinos not just in the city but all throughout the country. This orchid is widely grown in the backyard and is believed to bring good luck and fortune to those growing them. Its raspberry scent can be a bit nauseating for some,  Hence the Tagalog etymology  was derived from ” sangsang ” and ” umay ” or  nakaka-gumay .  This orchid species used to be found growing natural on big trees  in Novaliches area several decades ago, until the rapid development of the place after the second world war.

Medinilla magnifica

Locally known as Kapa-kapa because of the cape hood-like  flower bracts, Hence the Tagalog etymology  is  ” Kapa ” which  surround  its flowers .  The genus of Medinilla has about  is about 140 to 160 species which is widespread to the tropical regions of the Old World.

The genus was named after Juan de Medinilla governor of the Mariana islands in 1820.

This plant can reach more than 2 meters (6 feet) tall and is considered by horticulturalists to be a “shrub”. In tropical climates like those in Laguna they can  grow larger than 2  meters.

Often found as an epiphytic form (growing on trees) in  Philippines, Medinilla magnifica possesses deep green leaves that are thick, waxy, rich and very glossy.  Leaves reach about a foot long and have pale green veins.  Its small pink bracts (flowers) spring from “berries” that bear seeds and are produced throughout spring and summer in pendulous fashion.

For more information about Flora Filipina 2012 show , Here are some of the links:

https://renz15.wordpress.com/2012/02/24/flora-filipina-2012-ornamental-exhibits/

 https://renz15.wordpress.com/2012/02/24/flora-filipina-2012-exhibits/

 https://renz15.wordpress.com/2012/02/23/flora-filipina-2012-opening-highlights/

 https://renz15.wordpress.com/2012/02/22/flora-filipina-2012-pre-opening/

 

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