Manila Cathedral postcard with timbre cote vue cancellation

Manila Cathedral is one of the most photographed and featured cathedral in the country. Several postcard companies had featured this church since photography and postcards were introduced towards the end of the 19th century up to late 20th century.

Prior to the advent of photography, Majority of the early Manila Cathedral feature were drawn by local sketchers and international painters. Some of which are still around collected in different local archives like the one by Intramuros Administration, National Archives , National Library, Ortigas Library Foundation and foreign archives like those in Spain, Mexico, France and some early deltiologist (postcard collector).

Manila Cathedral circa between 1908 to 1910 with stamp in front and cancellation mark- the one on the right side was the Palacio del Gobernador ruins– the main square in front used to be called Plaza Mayor or Plaza Mckinley before it was renamed to Plaza Roma in 1961.

There are flame trees planted in the plaza towards the end of the 19th century and only the facade and pineapple ornamentation on the right side survived the last world war.

Manila Cathedral Postcard

back portion with handwriting and cancellation mark

Manila Cathedral is considered as mother of all churches in the archipelago. It was separate diocese on February 6, 1579 upon the issuance of papal bull.

The cross on top of the the central dome is a reference point of astronomical longitudes of the archipelago. Also it serves as a point of reference or kilometer zero for distances in the country.

Majority of the postcards printed during the American regime featured the 7th Cathedral architecture which is known as neo-byzantine style which only the main facade survived the last world war.

The present cathedral was a Romanesque revival or neo- Romanesque revival which was rebuilt between 1954 to 1958.

Timbre Corte Vue

This is called timbre cote vue or TVC which was normal way to place a stamp and then the cancel were placed on the face or picture side of a postcard. The message from the sender is also written on the front of this card and it is dated on the back by the sender.

There was a practice in the late 19th century to first quarter of the 20th century for early postcards to have stamps posted in front of the view. the cancellation marks also adds beauty to the front side. Unlike the usual practice among present day postcard collectors ( deltiologists) .

It had a 2 centavos Dr. Jose Rizal stamp with cancellation of January 5, 1910 4:30 pm and the postcard was send from Manila, Philippines to Rhone , France . It is an undivided back. The postcard was printed in Germany.

The recipient was Mr. A Rochet from 22 Rue Longue, Lyon, France

The sender or the postcard seller could be Mr. Jose A. Del Barrio with local address from Manila, Philippines.

Glad to have this postcard for a price of a pizza.

References and Useful Links:

Sources and References:

American Regime Manila Thru Postcards (part 1)

American Regime Manila Thru Postcards (part 2)

American Regime Manila Thru Postcards ( part 3)

American Regime Manila Thru Postcards ( part 4)

Personal interview with postcards collectors

Philippine Postcards.com: https://www.philippinepostcards.com/

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