Ilog Maria – Bee Farm and Museum

Ilog Maria Bee Farm and Museum

Ilog Maria Gate

This unique bee farm is located on flows from seven natural springs within the Magsaysay Family’s farm in the highlands of Silang, Cavite. Silang-  is renowned as Manila’s source of fresh fruits and excellent coffee. The entire town of more than 20,000 hectares is planted to a variety of fruits intercropped with coffee trees.

The town is also known for its horticultural industry were almost every home had some plants for sale.

This pristine environment is an ideal setting for a healthy rural lifestyle. It is also perfect for keeping honeybees.

Products such as candle, gel,ointment , honey, bath soaps,  bee propolis, Ilog Maria souvenir mugs in their souvenir shop. Long queues of local and foreign buyers had went to their shop . Some of our tour-mates confesses that they always buy these products from the company .

There is a beehive shaped building within the property which serves as  a bee museum and a function area. Seminars and workshop are conducted by appointment and a short video presentation may also be requested.

For more details visit their website

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Ugu Bigyan- Potter’s Garden & Workshop

Augusto “Ugo” Bigyan, the celebrated  artisan potter who has contributed to the fame of the province . During one of the field trips conducted by the Philippine Orchid Society, the tour  stopped by Ugu’s workshop in Barangay Lusacan, Tiaong Quezon . Philippine culture and arts  are evident with  the fusion  of   Mexican , Spanish , Asian -inspired architecture which dotted the entire compound.

The group was lucky  to meet the famous artisan conducting a short workshop

Ugo Bigyan’s art works are mostly the functional kind. One finds here plates made of soft stone molded after the shape of leaves; glazed three-colored glasses; the enchanting wind chimes; bracelets made from clay; bowls of different sizes and colors but all with simple but exquisite designs.

different potteries on display for sale

A simple candy receptacle or small plate is adorned with twigs where perched ceramic butterflies, bees, fishes  or birds.  The gallery bestsellers prove to be the big tapestries, big jars, plates and dinner sets, and other stoneware. And there are many more. These functional pieces can actually serve as objet d’arts.

jar with fossilized fern design

The gallery enjoys great patronage from well-known individuals, up-scale hotels and posh resorts such as Amanpulo, Campo Travieza, Casa Patricia, El Nido, Hidden Valley and Villa Escudero. Some of his potteries are  also exported to Europe, Japan, Taiwan , Canada, Latin America and United States.

Bigyan workshop and garden is a cluster of houses , with different motives and  architecture styles these also  include the house he lives in, a showroom, a workshop and several smaller pavilion type huts with Balinese and Javanese inspired . Bigyan’s main house was made from simple hollow blocks and coated with reddish terracotta. The front lawn was accentuated with a circular structure made of brick and equipped with throw pillows in woven buri cases, where family and friends can gather and chat, and at night, perhaps, create a bonfire. Another curious accent of the lawn was a rock, which was hollowed out and filled with water where little, floating quiapo plants grew. It was an innovative version of an outdoor potted plant. A winding pathways lead to other houses. The pathways themselves were interesting to look at. Some were made from cement and bricks with glazed, ceramic fishes served as accent. Others are made from old driftwood, which were actually pieces from knocked-down old houses, which Bigyan salvaged and gathered.

Collections of different works of art from different countries like figurines from Thailand, face masked from Indonesia , figurines from Mexico among others.

Broad-leaf-shaped pattern  footsteps made from cement. These footsteps were cast from actual leaves. Most of his clay works with flower and leaf motifs are cast from actual flowers and leaves.The process of embedding the leaves and flowers are called fossilizing .

These pathways lead to other houses. on the  the right of the terracotta house was another house that seemed to serve as workshop, storage and living quarter, behind was the showroom, where  Mr. Bigyan’s work were on display and were on sale. The two houses had a rugged  unfinished look.

interiors in one of the houses inside Bigyan’s compound

The houses are made  of bricks, natural adobe  and cement, they looked unfinished,quite similar to those in movies . The houses and pavilions inside the compound  looked  like ruins. Their  unfinished look was intentionally and was somehow intriguing.

tour group marveled at the orchids and ferns mounted on live trees

Aside from artistically displayed clayware, Ugu’s workshop offers quaint huts with which one can relax and leisurely enjoy a lush  landscaped garden with large mango trees  draped with native  orchids, ferns, creeping plants examples are Dendrobium anosmum, Dendrobium aphyllum, Dendrobium crumenatum , Hoya pubicalyx, Platycerium coronarium , Platycerium grande , Asplenium nidus , tillandsia trimmed with terracotta chimes, fountains and koi ponds.

Hoya pubicalyx a member of Asclepiadaceae

At the end of the tour , Mr. Carlos Valeriano C. Lazaro gave Mr. Bigyan a copy of Philippine Orchid Review magazine.

Contact Information:

Ugu Bigyan: Potter’s garden
alvarez village, lusacan, tiaong, quezon
tel. no.: (042) 5459144
mobile: 0917-5605708
Rates: pottery workshops or demonstrations may also be arranged.

Helpful tips:

1.) They are strict that you pay for the exact amount of headcount that you reserved since they buy the ingredients in the market based on the reservation. Make a reservation at least several days in advance ( minimum of at least 5 persons ).

2.) Best time to buy pottery items in Ugu are during the sale season. There are three sale sessions: first, is the Pahiyas sale on May 15 ); second, on his even birthdays August 14 discounted depending on his age and lastly during the first Sunday of October.

3.) Lunch is usually a fix set depends on what they can buy in the market. You can influence this a bit and try to change some of the items based on your preference.Merienda is also nice time to visit and get a sampling of their sago and gulaman.

4.). You can learn pottery here and decide to stay for a night. Reservations is required .

Gintong Talulot Orchid &Ornamental Farm

Gintong Talulot Orchid and Ornamental farm had several farms and outlets within southern Tagalog provinces.

Cattleya hybrids, Kagawaras, Mokaras, Epidendrums

Some of the collections are semi-terete Vandas, strap leaf Vandas, Mokaras, Kagawaras, Cattleya hybrids , native orchids like Dendrobium anosmum, Dendrobium aphyllum , Vanda lamellata . Ornamental plants like Hoya pubicalyx , Hoya obscura are also grown.

The farm also produces cut-flower which were supplied in nearby towns and provinces. The retired former professor in UPLB said that they started growing orchids as a mere hobby in the mid- 1970’s and through hard work and perseverance . They were able to send their children in school and was able to purchase some properties in Laguna, Cavite and Quezon and turned them into productive cut-flower farms.

rows of  planted  cut flower orchid varieties

The proprietors are active members of the

Los  Baños Orchid Society, Philippine Orchid Society.



Steven Ang’s -Hydroponic Farm

several varieties of lettuce are grown in this greenhouse

Steven Ang’s Vegetable Farm – One of the features of this vegetable farm is the Hydroponics (from the Greek words hydro water and ponos labor) is a method of growing plants using mineral nutrient solutions, without soil. Soil less culture.
Gericke originally defined hydroponics as crop growth in mineral nutrient solutions, with no solid medium for the roots. He objected in print to people who applied the term hydroponics to other types of soil less culture such as sand culture and gravel culture.

The distinction between hydroponics and soil less culture of plants has often been blurred. Soil less culture is a broader term than hydroponics; it only requires that no soils with clay or silt are used. Note that sand is a type of soil yet sand culture is considered a type of soil less culture. Hydroponics is a subset of soil less culture. Many types of soil less culture do not use the mineral nutrient solutions required for hydroponics.

Mr. Steven Ang is an active member of the Philippine Orchid Society , Philippine Horticultural Society , a certified  chef  and  an entrepreneur .

According to Mr. Ang,  he supplies several restaurants and supermarket in Metro Manila and surrounding areas. He had an interesting collections of cactus, hibiscus, roses in his farm.

members and guests bought hydroponic  grown lettuce

The tour group was treated with a free sampling of hydroponic grown lettuce and before leaving the farm , some of the members bought freshly harvested vegetables sold at an ex-farm price.

Victory Garden

Last May 23, 2009 the members of the Philippine Orchid Society went to the province of Cavite for a field trip.

collection of bonsai and ornamental plants

One of the gardens  that was included in the itinerary was Victory Bonsai & Ornamental Garden in Cavite. The place had an impressive collection of cactus and succulents, bonsai, fruits trees,  orchids, ornamental plants and also accepts landscaping jobs  . The family also sells beautiful ceramic and potteries at retail and wholesale price.

specimen sized opuntia cactus in a flat dish

The proprietors of the garden is also an active members of the Cactus and Succulent Society of the Philippines, Philippine Horticultural Society , Philippine Orchid Society .

The garden is also perfect hub  for meetings, weddings and birthday parties. tour  group  was treated with late morning breakfast which consists of instant coffee ,   a pancake meal from a fast food restaurant.

members and guests posed for a group shot

The group happily pose for a group shot and  went into a buying spree .

For inquiries:

Telephone ( 632) 2531286

Fax (632) 255-8626

Mobile (0917)5397841 / (0922)875 7539

AGRI-LINK 2009

Come & Visit!!! Philippines’ biggest and most prestigious international trade show on agribusiness, food and fishery. THEME: ” Sustainable Food Production: Focus on the Filipino Market”

The country’s world-class food products are set to draw international attention at the forthcoming Agrilink, Foodlink and Aqualink 2009, which is slated at the World Trade Center, Roxas Blvd., Pasay City on October 9-11.

  • 16th International Agribusiness Exhibition and Seminars
  • 10th International Food Processing, Packaging and Products Exhibition
  • 5th National Fisheries Exhibition and Seminars

Seminars

October 8, 3:30-5:30pm (Thursday), Venue: Tent, WTC

  • Snap Hydrophonics
  • Indigenous Plants for Health and Wellness
  • Food Safety Assurance System: Key to Meet Global Demands for Safety & Quality of Exported Food Products
  • Quantum Agriculture

October 9, 10:30am-12:30pm (Friday), Venue: Tent, WTC

  • Snap Hydrophonics
  • Indigenous Plants for Health and Wellness
  • Making Money Out of Guppies & Other Live Bearers
  • Raising Koi & Other Egg Layers for Fun & Profit
  • Going for the Big Time by Raising High Value Ornamentals
  • Niche Market vs. Mass Market in Aquaculture
  • Organic Local Market & Global Trade
  • Organic Poultry & Piggery Presentation

1:00-3:00pm

  • HUCC Postharvest Processing Technologies
  • The Road to the Control of Disease Outbreaks in Pigs: No Shortcuts…No Blind Curves..
  • Bamboo for Sustainable Environmental Protection & Economic Development

1:00-3:00pm

  • Seminar on Demystifying eLearning
  • Investment Opportunities in Mariculture Parks
  • Culture & Market Potentials of Pangasius
  • Introducing the Humback Grouper
  • Cage Culture of Macrobrachium in Inland Waters
  • The Use of Bamboo & Local Materials for Local Buildings

October 10, 10:30am-12:30pm (Saturday), Venue: Tent, WTC

  • All About Medicinal Herbs

1:00-6:00pm

  • Business Opportunities in Mariculture Parks/Zones
  • Climate Adaptation Measures for Fisherfolks: The Region 8 Success Story
  • Farming Potential of Peneaus Vannamei or PacificWhite Shrimp in Freshwater Systems
  • Improvement of Farmed Seaweed Seedstocks Through Tissue Culture
  • Development Plan for the Philippine Ornamental Fish Industry
  • Global Competitiveness of the Philippine Ornamental Fish
  • The Wawa & Yoreka Success Stories
  • Ornamental Fish Health & Quality Control Protocols
  • Export Procedures for Ornamental Fish

3:30-5-30pm

  • Development Indexing – Social Return of Investment

Special Events (Venue: Lobby, WTC)

  • 10:30am-12:00nn – Agri-Kapihan Forum: Latest in Organic Farming
  • 3:00pm-5:00pm – Cooking Demonstration: Latest Trends of Meat Processing with the Use of Fiber Technology

Paco Park centuries-old trees

Paco Park is a 4,114.80 square meter recreational garden area and was once Manila   municipal cemetery during the Spanish colonial period. It is located along General Luna St. and at the east end of Padre Faura street in Paco district  of the southern  part of Manila.

The park  was originally planned as a municipal cemetery of the rich and established aristocratic Spanish  families  who resided in the old Manila, or the city within the walls of Intramuros  during the Spanish colonial era.  Most of the wealthy families interred the remains of their loved ones inside the municipal cemetery in what was once the district of Dilao (former name for Paco). The cemetery was built in the late 1700s but was completed several decades later and in 1822.  The inner wall erected according to the plan of Maestro de Obras Nicolas Ruiz was originally constructed exclusively for the Iberian dead . The cemetery was used to inter victims of a cholera epidemic that swept across the city. The cemetery was enlarged in 1859.

The cemetery is circular in shape, with an inner circular fort that was the original cemetery and with the niches that were placed or located within the hollow walls. As the population continued to grow, a second outer wall was built with the thick adobe walls were hollowed as niches and the top of the walls were made into pathways for promenades. A Roman Catholic chapel was built inside the walls of the Paco Park and it was dedicated to Saint Pancratius.

Governor General  Ramon Solano was   interred at the chapel inside the Saint Pancratius .

Century-old acacia trees within Paco Park in Paco , Manila

Acacia ( Samanea saman) trees were planted in the park in the later half of the 19th century imported from South America were added in order to further beautify the park. These trees witness the interment of Dr. Jose Protacio Rizal y Realonda days after his execution at Bagumbayan ( Rizal Park). Relatives of Dr. Jose Rizal  purposely inverted his name to avoid the Spanish officials to detect  his whereabouts . 2 years later , his remains were exhumed and placed in an urn kept in his mother’s home in Calle Magdalena  Binondo.

inverted name of Jose P. Rizal inside the Paco Park

In 1912, burial or interment at the Paco Park ceased. It had been the burial ground for several generations and descendants of those who were buried in the park had the remains of their ancestors transferred. During the  outbreak of the second world war , Japanese forces used Paco Park as a central supply and ammunition depot. The high thick adobe walls around the park was ideal for defensive positions of the Japanese. The Japanese just before the liberation of Manila in 1945 , dug several trenches and pill boxes around and within the Park with three 75 millimeter guns to defend their fortification . The park was converted into a national park in 1965 during the term of President Diosdado Macapagal . Paco Park’s grandeur was slowly restored after the war and since then has remained as a public park and promenade for many teen age sweethearts who could spend quiet moments along the park’s benches and private alcoves.

Dendrobium orchids mounted on a live  tree

Paco Park and its care was placed under the responsibility of the National Park’s Development Committee (NPDC) during the regime of President Ferdinand E. Marcos , through the efforts of former First Lady Imelda R. Marcos, culture  and arts was given emphasis and priority in the country and Paco Park was one of the few venues chosen to host events related to culture. On February 29, 1980 , then Press and Cultural Attache of the Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany in the Philippines, Dr. Christoph Jessen with then NPDC Vice-Chairperson Mr. Teodoro Valencia started a classical concert within Paco Park as part of the celebrations for the “Philippine-German Month,” and the program became a tradition, a weekly fare held every Friday afternoons and called the, “Paco Park Presents.

native Dischidia ionantha drapped the trunks of this tree

Some of the historical trees were eventually toppled  down by  Bagyong Rosing (Typhoon Angela)in 1995 and Bagyong Milenyo ( Typhoon Xangsane) in 2006.

What remains of the old heritage trees inside the park needed rehabilitation.

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