20 Spooky Places in Quezon City

Quezon City is a large sprawling city which had her own share of spooky places, haunted buildings, heritage trees, creepy tales tucked in her colorful history.

We came up with at least 35 places within the city that people had experienced or find some paranormal activities or haunted stories. We decided to narrow down the list to 20.

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20 Spooky Places within Quezon City

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Sacred Heart Novitiate -Novaliches (photo courtesy of Ms. Jo Quimpo)

20.) Sacred Heart Novitiate. Retreat House and Seminary 1118 Quirino Highway, Novaliches –  Sacred Heart Novitiate was erected in 1932 as a chosen site for seminarian and priest who wanted to have a peaceful retreat under the cool weather and simpler lifestyle away from hustle and bustle of the city life.

In the 1930’s, Novaliches is primary an agricultural town with few people living beyond the northern part of Bayan ( town proper).

Jesuit retrieval team from the Sacred Heart Novitiate in Novaliches, Quezon City, spent two separate days in December 1945 gathering all the remains from the niches, for transfer to the Jesuit Cemetery at the Novitiate.

The haunted stories in this seminary started way back in the 1960’s, when some people reported seeing some headless priests, nuns and even people dressed in Katipunero within the cemetery compound in unexpected manner.

Some people would recall that they would refer the place as ‘ masukal‘ densely covered with trees or vegetation even in the late the 1970’s. Some residents would recount that there might be unseen spirits who might have been disturbed when Quirino Highway was widened. Another expert recount that some of the long dead priest wanted some prayers.

19.) Saint Paul University of Quezon City – In some portion of the comfort rooms inside the university. They say that a girl who committed suicide is known to show herself to students. An alumni would also recount a Japanese soldier who lurks within the old building of the university.

Another alumni recounted that she would get lost within some parts of the buildings during her stay in the campus.

18.) Poveda College -The school had a black garden behind the chapel in which a former student who hanged herself spirit. Another story is of an old friar who is spotted in one of his favorite classrooms during early morning.

17.) Flos Carmeli Institution – The school was conceived in 1972 the Catholic school—the name of which literally means “Flower of Carmel” within Fairview, Quezon City.  It is located 12 Carmel Street, Fairview Park.

The owners of Fairview subdivision Mr. and Mrs. Bonifacio Regalado offered a land to be manage by the first superior of the Sister of Mount Carmel in the Philippines. The school got their first graduates in 1975 and had a large sprawling campus of about 1.4 hectares.

The school closed down in 2012 due to dwindling number of enrollment and bankruptcy. Eerie sound of children reciting were still being heard by some residents who lives near the abandoned school.

16.) Camp Crame– One of the spookiest place within the camp is the main building. Some former military personnel would be spotted marching around the campus, while Japanese sentry guards are sometimes spotted even in noontime.

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Saint Joseph College

15.) Saint Joseph College – One of the oldest building and structure constructed along E. Rodriguez Sr. avenue. Students, employees and security guards would cite some stories.  Among the most popular is the headless nun, Japanese sentry guard which guards the old building and American gentleman are spotted jogging.

14.) Ninoy Aquino Parks and Wildlife Center– The villas and small quonset huts were popular to photographers,film crews shooting at the lush man made lagoon and big trees within the sanctuary. There were reports of sightings of ethereal beings which dwells in some decades- old balete trees and villas located within the sanctuary. There were also reports of orbs spotted by a couple of well-known photographer.

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NCBA compound along Aurora Boulevard

13.) NCBA compound – some of the students, employees and security guards would swear that sounds and creaking voices at the upper portion of building.

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tamarind tree

12.) Tamarid Tree in Narra street, Barangay Amihan, Project 3, Quezon City- The tamarind tree is considered heritage tree of the district.

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heritage tree marker

The tree is said to be home of several enkanto, tikbalangs and ethereal beings.

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narra street

There were several attempts to cut the tree in the past,Those who would try to attempt would risk getting sick or died in a mysterious way.

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tamarind tree which grows along narra street and molave street

There are two tamarind trees located within Narra street. Another tamarind tree also had reported some sighting.

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According to one jeepney driver which ply the Project 2 and 3 route, recounted that as long as people would respect the tree like saying “tabi-tabi po” or excuse me when passing underneath its trunk.  It is polite way to request unseen spirits to move to the side. One way is not to harm the tree like cutting the branches, hammering nails unto the branches.

11.) Q.C. Ville near Central avenue – The area used to have a lot of large trees and there might be spiritual beings disturbed during the construction process and development of of the subdivision. There were reports of dwarves, white lady and ghouls that have been spotted in some of the houses.

10.) Miriam College – ghost of a nun in the ladies’ restroom at the 4th floor of the Caritas Building.

9.) Quezon Institute compound- used to be known as Santol Sanatorium. There were several art deco buildings located within the compound. The old buildings were host to lot of ghostly stories. One recounts that a Japanese sentry soldiers would bow down to passers-by and patients. Another story is of hauling sounds during wee hours were heard by guards.

8.) Capitol Medical Institute– According to some feng shui experts, the main entrance of the hospital is facing the wrong direction hence attracts bad elements unto the hospital. Another expert say that, the hospital location is the problem.

There are certain times that one of the elevators would malfunction despite being in good working order. There were also some reported sightings of shadows and former employee on some floors.

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Benitez Hall

7.) University of the Philippines campus – There were several buildings within the campus that had some ethereal spotting among which is the Benitez Hall (College of Education) had its share of haunted stories. One of which claims that former Dean Francisco Benitez is seen observing classes.

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Melchor Hall

Some of the buildings which had their own share of haunting tales also included the Quezon Hall,College of Music,Vanguard Building, Palma Hall and Guerrero Theater.

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Quezon Hall

6.) Ateneo de Manila University – Employees, students, professors and those with strong psychic vibes would say that the old Communication Department Building is the most haunted place in the university. Ghost sightings includes a mother and child figure climbing the stairs to the second floor, a deceased Jesuit priest,old janitor and several Japanese soldiers.

Other spooky place within the campus were the Cervini, Eliazo dormitories, Rizal library , Jesuits Retirement House and Old Mango Tree at High School Oval. According to old time residents which lived near the present day campus, it was formerly a military camp during World War II and had a cemetery before the remains was re-interred somewhere.

Paranormal experts would say that the campus were home to some unseen spirits that were disturbed during the construction of the campus. While another spirit questor advise that there were some people that got emotionally attached to the place that their spirits would dwell on these buildings long after they were gone.

5.) Balara Filtration Plant – It is a 60 hectare property which houses filtration plant, several art deco style building and Balara Filtration Windmill.

According to some paranormal experts, parts of Balara, Ateneo, UP campus, Miriam College and La Vista Subdivision used to be forest areas during the Spanish and early American colonial regime. Many areas were home to these spiritual beings who were disturbed when development took place. The spirits which dwell on trees and surrounding areas were not properly cast away. Hence some of the elemental spirits have moved to the buildings and built areas with ease.

4.) Children’s Hospital – There are some reported ethereal sightings of children at the 3rd floor of the hospital. Some say that it was the spirits of the unborn babies who died without proper burials or blessing that still lingers some of the rooms of the hospital.

3.) Veterans Memorial Medical Center (formerly known as Veterans Memorial Hospital) was established in 1955. Nurses, employees,security guards and even visitors would gave some accounts of stories. One retired employee say that a well -known gentleman who dress in a period dress is General Emilio Aguinaldo. Some say that it was the former president Sergio Osmeña Sr. seen walking in the hallways.

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Goodah

2.) Ozone Disco now Goodah -On March 18, 1996 a tragic fire in which 150 people died  inside Ozone Disco, a go to club located in the corner of Timog and Tomas Morato Avenues in Quezon City.  Despite the new management, new building employees can still hear voices during wee hours of the night. Residents from nearby townhouses and condominium units can still hear faint ghostly disco music and faint apparition of teens.

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Balete drive

1.) Balete Drive derives the name from Balete or Ficus trees which used to be abundant within the street. Balete tree is believed to be the dwelling place mythological creatures like kapre, tikbalang or any ethereal being. The narrow road is about 1.4 kilometers long which intersect major thoroughfares like E. Rodriguez Sr. , Aurora Boulevard and Nicanor Domingo street.

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Balete drive corner 9th street

There were several takes of white ghost, tikbalangs and Japanese era soldiers lurking on some ancestral houses and along the street.

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Balete drive

 The white lady story started in the early 1950’s with at least 3 to 4 versions. Some say that the tales were magnified in films, taxi drivers and urban legend.

A more detailed story came from a distant relative who lived near E. Rodriguez Sr. Avenue said that there were local gangs who would victimized unsuspected passersby and maybe carjacked private vehicles coming from Highway 54 (now EDSA). The area used to be dimly lighted in the 1950’s. This is also to deter people from passing or taking that route.

There were also some skeptics who told us that it was real estate agents or companies who would magnify the story so that the land value within the area would not increase.

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Balete drive also host to several old mango trees, acacia tree and frangipanis (kalachuchi) in which many parts are poorly lighted. Most of the walls had Ficus pumila growing. There were parts of the street which had blind spot which are accident prone to motorist and drivers.

Some residents and even taxi drivers say that the white lady tends to be spotted after heavy downpour, full moon or during intense heat between 12:00 midnight to 4:00 am in between Mabolo, Sampaguita and Bougainvilla streets.

Note: This is an incomplete list of spooky places in Quezon City in which were given by relatives, friends , paranormal experts,stories from employees, students, alumni and other personal accounts.

A Visit to San Juan de Dios Church and Parochial Museum

San Juan de Dios Church and Parochial Museum, Barangay Poblacion ,  San Rafael – Bulacan province

San Rafael Poblacion Church is also known as San Juan De Dios Parish

The town of San Rafael had its humble beginning as part of the Hacienda de Buenavista ( now part of San Ildefonso )  under the San Juan de Dios brothers. Though belonging to that religious group, the place was however administered by the Augustinian friars who established the mission in 1750.

curve facade

The church architecture is a classic example of Partido Baroque architecture in the Philippines. The style, popular from the early to mid-19th century, boasts of a curved facade as opposed to the flat ones typically found in other Baroque churches in the country.

historical marker

interior of the church

church altar

The church facade and interiors were painted in pastel colors,  looks bright and pleasing to the eyes, but it had a grim and sad story to tell behind those pastel colored walls and facade . The church and the nearby parochial college tells a different story .

Colegio de San Juan de Dios with century- old acacia trees

We also took some photos of Colegio de San Juan de Dios ( the college used to be known as Saint Paul’s School) .The school premises had several large acacia trees with dischidias or manaog ka irog which cling to their massive trunks.   When some of us took the first glanced at the structure, we felt some eerie  feelings and felt that someone is looking at us . According to one of the locals , parts of the present school used to be part of the public cemetery .

 artist depiction  of battle of San Rafael inside the church 

Local historian and town folks  said that bodies of those people which numbered from 800 to more than 1,000 people were killed on November 30, 1896 . There was a town fiesta and people were at the church premises when the massacre took place, they are mostly innocent civilians , children and people who came for the fiesta .

church bell cast from Hilario Sunico foundry in Binondo

San Juan de Dios Parish Museum / San Rafael Parochial Museum or Museo San Rafael

The Museo San Rafael was officially opened on September 29, 2006 during the feast of San Rafael, coinciding with the 256th founding anniversary of the town. Besides the main hall of the convent, three rooms now house different exhibits.

 saint images and ecclesiastical items used by the church 

We took some time exploring the church and also the parish museum.  Mr. Chael Santos had negotiated prior hand  with the parish priest , Our tour group was allowed entry at the parish museum .

church vestments

There is also a place where the parish museum had an interesting display of church vestments .

period costumes on display

There were some period costumes on display reflecting a gentle era of the town

old retablo

sala set made from wood

The public can visit the parish museum during office hours but the staffs and parish priest must be inform several days prior to the visit. One must also be very careful in their steps,  since parts of the wood flooring is weak and were eaten by termites .

Our group was allowed to enter another exhibit are which they call museo ng bayan exhibit , only 3 to 4 people were allowed to enter since the floor is not that stable .

Story of Crispin , Basilio and Noli Me Tangere :

People from the town believes that Dr. Jose P. Rizal  was inspired to create the characters Sisa, Basilio and Crispin (in his novel Noli Me Tangere)  published in Berlin in 1887. Noli Me Tangere and its sequel, El Filibusterismo, exposed abuses of the Spanish friars and earned for Rizal the ire of the Spanish authorities.  The novel was said to have been adapted to the real-life story in San Rafael during the late 19th century . Recalling the story from Rizal’s novel, the two brothers were serving as bell ringers in the church to help their mother ( Sisa)  by earning money.

life-sized mannequin  of Dr. Jose P. Rizal and painting of crispin , basilio and sacristan mayor

The Rizal mannequin sits behind a desk, writing. He faces the well where Crispin’s body was supposedly dumped.

On one occasion, the sacristan mayor accused Crispin of stealing an amount of money. Crispin was punished by the sacristan mayor and was believed to have died inside the church premises. On the day the loss was discovered ( 2 gold coins ) , He was not permitted to leave the convent, while his elder brother was allowed to leave only after 10 p.m., which was past the 9 p.m. curfew.

painting showed the physical abuse of Crispin and Basilio

As proof of the local legend, locals point to a blood-stained wall off the side of the convent in a small room where supposedly the young “Crispin” was tortured to death today their soul are present in convent.

hand stained portion of the wall believed to be that of Crispin

The head sacristan dragged Crispin down the stairs from the bell tower and into the shadows. That was the last time Basilio saw his younger brother.

church belfry

Some stories would tell of the revolutionary period where hundreds and even thousand of people perished.  the hand marks used to be in darker and more reddish in color several years ago , before this portion of the church was renovated in the late 1990’s .

This is the area where locals believed that Crispin was push to his death and Basilio escaped .

well

Fray Antonio Piernavieja was the friar that Dr. Jose Rizal took his character inspiration for Padre Salvi . It was widely believed that he was the said priest in the novel. He was transferred to Cavite in the middle part of 1896 when the revolution broke out . He was taken as a prisoner and made as a bishop by the Filipino insurgents  .

group photo

Fray Antonio Piernavieja took the advantage of his new position and gave vital information and tactical plans of the insurgents to the Spanish authorities that were based in Manila. Upon the discovery of the plan , the insurgents tied the friar in an open field and left him to die from hunger and thirst.

group photo

People would also claim the cemetery mentioned in Rizal’s novel is the Pasong Instik area.

We got to have a group photo before we bid farewell to the local priest and gave our donation to the museum .  Some of us had still some questions in our mind , if the stories are true , was it based on a true story or urban legend that refuses to die .

 References and Bibliographies :

Noli Me Tangere and El Filibusterismo books

San Rafael Website: http://www.sanrafael.gov.ph

Official Website of the Municipal Government of San Rafael. “San Rafael Festivals”. sanrafael.gov.ph. Retrieved May 24, 2014.

Official Website of the Provincial Government of Bulacan. http://bulacan.gov.ph/sanrafael/history.php

Philippine Star : http://www.philstar.com/entertainment/2014/05/15/1323160/haunting-san-rafael-church

Zamora, F. “Sisa, Crispin and Basilio lived here, say Bulacan townsfolk”. inquirer.net. Retrieved May 24, 2014.

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