Manila Cathedral postcard with timbre cote vue cancellation

Manila Cathedral is one of the most photographed and featured cathedral in the country. Several postcard companies had featured this church since photography and postcards were introduced towards the end of the 19th century up to late 20th century.

Prior to the advent of photography, Majority of the early Manila Cathedral feature were drawn by local sketchers and international painters. Some of which are still around collected in different local archives like the one by Intramuros Administration, National Archives , National Library, Ortigas Library Foundation and foreign archives like those in Spain, Mexico, France and some early deltiologist (postcard collector).

Manila Cathedral circa between 1908 to 1910 with stamp in front and cancellation mark- the one on the right side was the Palacio del Gobernador ruins– the main square in front used to be called Plaza Mayor or Plaza Mckinley before it was renamed to Plaza Roma in 1961.

There are flame trees planted in the plaza towards the end of the 19th century and only the facade and pineapple ornamentation on the right side survived the last world war.

Manila Cathedral Postcard

back portion with handwriting and cancellation mark

Manila Cathedral is considered as mother of all churches in the archipelago. It was separate diocese on February 6, 1579 upon the issuance of papal bull.

The cross on top of the the central dome is a reference point of astronomical longitudes of the archipelago. Also it serves as a point of reference or kilometer zero for distances in the country.

Majority of the postcards printed during the American regime featured the 7th Cathedral architecture which is known as neo-byzantine style which only the main facade survived the last world war.

The present cathedral was a Romanesque revival or neo- Romanesque revival which was rebuilt between 1954 to 1958.

Timbre Corte Vue

This is called timbre cote vue or TVC which was normal way to place a stamp and then the cancel were placed on the face or picture side of a postcard. The message from the sender is also written on the front of this card and it is dated on the back by the sender.

There was a practice in the late 19th century to first quarter of the 20th century for early postcards to have stamps posted in front of the view. the cancellation marks also adds beauty to the front side. Unlike the usual practice among present day postcard collectors ( deltiologists) .

It had a 2 centavos Dr. Jose Rizal stamp with cancellation of January 5, 1910 4:30 pm and the postcard was send from Manila, Philippines to Rhone , France . It is an undivided back. The postcard was printed in Germany.

The recipient was Mr. A Rochet from 22 Rue Longue, Lyon, France

The sender or the postcard seller could be Mr. Jose A. Del Barrio with local address from Manila, Philippines.

Glad to have this postcard for a price of a pizza.

References and Useful Links:

Sources and References:

American Regime Manila Thru Postcards (part 1)

American Regime Manila Thru Postcards (part 2)

American Regime Manila Thru Postcards ( part 3)

American Regime Manila Thru Postcards ( part 4)

Personal interview with postcards collectors

Philippine Postcards.com: https://www.philippinepostcards.com/

Popular Ancient Spots in Rome, Italy thru Vintage Postcards

Popular landmarks in Rome was a favorite theme in many vintage or old postcards issued in Italy. The postcards had a peculiar way of affixing the stamp. The stamp is usually posted at the face of the postcard rather than the back. portion.

Popular Tourists Spot in Rome and Vatican

The postcard seller posted 4-cartes postales anciennes, old-postcards-ITALIE – The first set of landmarks includes includes Tomb of Caecilia Metella, Saint Peter’s Basilica and Square, Forum of Trajan and Colosseum used to be retailed at 3.95 Euro but was on sale for 2.77 Euro ( Php 160.21). The first set was probably issued between 1910 to 1920’s.

The popular landmarks are also some of the ancient landmarks which dates back during the middle or late Roman empire. Some of which are at least hundreds or even at thousand of years -old.

L-R top view Saint Peter’s Basilica and Arch of Titus, Below (L-R) Roman Forum and Trevi Fountain with stamp in front view ( timbre cote vue)

second lot includes Saint Peter Basilica, Arch of Titus, Roman Forum and Trevi Fountain the first set of postcard was on sale for 2.77 Euro about (Php 160.21) but used to be retailed at 3.95 Euro, there was a 29% off on these set of postcard. the shipping is standard Euro 1.75 or about ( Php 101.21) the second set was issued between 1911’s to 1920’s.

(TVC) Timbre Cote Vue

“Timbre Cote Vue” shorter abbreviation for is TVC is a French term for where the stamp then the cancel were placed on the face or picture side of a postcard. The message from the sender is also written on the front of this card and it is dated on the back by the sender.

L-R Santa Maria de Cosmedia, Spanish Steps ( Scalinata di TrinitĂ  dei Monti) Rome, Saint Peter’s Basilica (Vatican City) and La fontana delle Naiadi . All the four postcards have 5 and 10 centisimi definitive stamp posted from Italy. The stamp were posted in front view.

Lot number 3 originally for sale at 3.95 Euros, but was marked down for just 2.77 Euros ( Php 160.21) with 29% discount. The postcards and stamps are dated between 1910 to early 1920’s. The postcards are between 100 to 110 years-old. Considering the big discount, We lost no time to contact the seller and bought the three lots.

This fad is not just in Europe but also in many parts of the world. In the Philippines, This was the practice by some postal authorities and postcard senders in the late 19th to mid 20th century. A sample timbre cote vue is the Puerta Real postcard featured several months ago.

References, Sources and Bibliographies:

Italy Stamps from 1900 to 1909 Stamp World

Stanley Gibbons- Italy Stamps

Scott’s Publishing Company Catalog- Italy

Further Readings and Related Links:

American Regime Manila thru postcards (part 1)

American Regime Manila thru postcards ( part 2)

American Regime Manila thru postcards (part 3)

American Regime Manila thru postcards ( part 4 )

Chicago Postcard Museum

Herpin, Georges. “Bapteme” in Le Collectionneur de Timbres-Postes, Vol.I, 15 November 1864, p.20.

Sutton, R.J. & K.W. Anthony. The Stamp Collector’s Encyclopaedia. 6th edition. London: Stanley Paul, 1966.

Patrick, Douglas & Mary. The Hodder Stamp Dictionary, Hodder & Stoughton, London, 1973, p.261. ISBN 0-340-17183-9.

Philippine Postcards page 130 to 137 Consuming Passions

Vintage Puerta Real Postcard

Puerta Real which means (Royal Gate) was built in 1663 at the end of Calle Real de Palacio (now General Luna Street) and was used exclusively by the Governor-General for state occasions.

The gate was destroyed during the brief British occupation and was rebuilt in 1780 and moved further west to its present location as part of the new defense plan for Intramuros. During the Battle of Manila, the gate was damaged. It was restored in 1969 with additional work made in 1989.

Compared to Puerta Isabel 2 in which some portions of the wall was not restored. Puerta real gate was transformed into beautiful garden ideal for pre-nuptial photography, wedding and event.

Puerta Real Gate with two stamps affixed which bore the portrait of Dr. Jose Rizal valued at 2 centavos

Vintage Puerta Real Postcard

Postcards were popular souvenir item send to relatives, friends and acquaintances during the American regime. Americans were curious on their far flung Asian colony. It was from around 1900 to 1940 where the golden age of postcards stemmed from a combination of social, economic, education and governmental factors.

It was also the rise of faster means of communication from steam ships to airplane. Sending of letters, telegrams and postcards became faster from the point of origin to the recipient.

Early collectors would fancy anthropological theme, costumes, buildings, people washings clothes and carabaos.

During this time saw a peculiar way of affixing stamps on postcard. There are some stamps which were affix together with the photo and the cancellation marks are quite visible. Some enterprising philatelists, curio store owners and even tourists would send their mailed postcards abroad.

Some would deliberately put a higher denomination stamps to further increase the value. There were some postcard collectors who would fancy the way on how the stamp were affixed on the postcard.

Sometimes they are incorrectly called Maxicard. Postcards with a postage stamp placed on the picture side of the card and tied by the cancellation, usually the first day of issue or during the date of travel which makes the postcard special and cherish mementos among early travelers.

It was from French term “timbre cote vue” – This was a fad not just in Europe but in many parts of the world. It placed the postage stamp on the picture side of the postcard. The term told authorities that the stamp is placed upon the view side. Sometimes these words were hand printed or applied with rubber stamps, can also be omitted. since the stamps have no relations with the postcard.

References, Sources and Bibliographies:

American Regime Manila thru postcards (part 1)

American Regime Manila thru postcards ( part 2)

American Regime Manila thru postcards (part 3)

American Regime Manila thru postcards ( part 4 )

Chicago Postcard Museum

Herpin, Georges. “Bapteme” in Le Collectionneur de Timbres-Postes, Vol.I, 15 November 1864, p.20.

Sutton, R.J. & K.W. Anthony. The Stamp Collector’s Encyclopaedia. 6th edition. London: Stanley Paul, 1966.

Patrick, Douglas & Mary. The Hodder Stamp Dictionary, Hodder & Stoughton, London, 1973, p.261. ISBN 0-340-17183-9.

Philippine Postcards page 130 to 137 Consuming Passions

Personal interview

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